Tough Mudder Survival Kit for the Muslim woman

In my last post I told you all about my experience taking on Tough Mudder. In this post I want to give you my opinion on the kind of kit I think other Muslim women should wear if they’re thinking of taking on Tough Mudder or a similar mud run event. So here goes…

  • A tight waterproof one piece headscarf
  • A second tight waterproof one piece headscarf that can be tied on to you to change into after water obstacles – the cold water blocks up in your ears under the scarf
  • Expensive quality leggings and t-shirt
  • The lightest weighing trainers you can find
  • A fleece hoody
  • Sports gloves
  • A sports bra
  • Cotton high leg or shortie knickers

 

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Ayesha’s Tough Mudder Story

I got down on my knees, closed my eyes and inhaled what only seemed like a life-size tub of Vicks Vapo-Rub. Never in my life had I ever screamed so much profanity as I wriggled my way through the tightest and muddiest of tunnels. I tried so hard to keep my mouth shut and hold my breath, ‘anything’ I thought, to keep the immense amount of menthol vapour that was blasted in my face from winning over me.  And that, was just one of twenty-nine staggering obstacles I overcame during my Tough Mudder experience.

I’m one of those ‘on and off’ types when it comes to hitting the gym. My twenty pounds a month subscription doesn’t often show much return, but I refuse to give it up – I need it to keep me going emotionally. When I’m there, I’m good. I feel strong. I feel empowered.

I was working in Corporate Communications for a company that went on to sponsor Mini Mudder, the kids’ version of Tough Mudder in the Summer of 2015. My colleague managed to secure free tickets (normally up to £90) for a set number of us to take part. When I was initially asked if I wanted volunteer I laughed and said ‘yeah sure’ without even thinking about it. Then came the day that I discovered my name was down on the official list. ‘Crap’, I thought, ‘I’m not fit enough for this!’ But anyone who knows me well enough knows two things about me; I’m always up for a crazy challenge and I love defying the stereotype of a Muslim woman. And I was the only Muslim here, I had to do this for my women. Continue reading Ayesha’s Tough Mudder Story

No different from the next runner

Nice article on the ParkRun website:

22-year-old university student Namrah Shahid had never run before taking part in Woodhouse Moor parkrun for the first time last April.

By her own admission she was instantly hooked, and Namrah is now working with Leeds University to encourage other female Muslims to take part in physical activity by breaking down some of the barriers that stand in their way.

When it comes down to it, the key difference between being a hijabi runner (wearing a Muslim female head covering) and any other runner is simply the dress code. As a hijabi runner I am no different from the next runner, but yet female Muslims are enormously underrepresented in running events and organised physical activity in general.

Read the article in full here: http://blog.parkrun.com/uk/2017/02/03/no-different-to-the-next-runner/

 

How to Choose the Right Sports Hijab

Fitness requires the utmost comfort and what that means is being comfortable in your fitness attire. If you are a hijabi, comfort and safety in sports are equally important. To get the best fitness experience in a hijab, there are a 3 key areas you need to remember :  Fabric, Safety, Design Continue reading How to Choose the Right Sports Hijab

Keeping Fit Without Compromising Modesty

AM Active by Greg Goodale_93-EditIt seems that hardly any of us are as fit as we should be, these days. Islam encourages a healthy approach to all aspects of life spiritual, mental and physical so it’s entirely permissible for women to exercise; the problem is that many Muslim women feel uncomfortable exercising in public. Western sportswear is often quite revealing, and some sporting activities can feel like a threat to modesty.

Not so long ago, I went to a gym and saw a woman trying to work out in a full Sawar Kamez. While I could sympathize, and knew exactly why she was doing it–she wanted to get fit, without compromising her religion–I could also see how dangerous what she was doing was. What if some of the loose fabric caught in the mechanisms of the machines she was using? She could have had a terrible accident. It got me to thinking about how Muslim ladies could stay healthy without worrying about either exposing themselves, or injuring themselves.

Four Ways of Keep Fit without Compromising Modesty

1. Ask at your local gym if they have any ladies only sessions. Most will.  There’s a big market for all female exercise classes, whether swimming, aerobics, spin classes, or simply using the gym equipment. If your local gym doesn’t offer anything, why not get a group of friends together and suggest that they do? Most businesses are keen to attract new customers, so you could be helping them out too.

2. Try exercising outdoors. You don’t necessarily need to go to a gym to get fit; a good walk or a jog can be a brilliant way to get your heart beating and your muscles working. If you have kids, pushing a pram up a hill is almost as good a gym session!

AM Active by Greg Goodale_100-Edit3. Find some modest sportswear. I had great difficulty doing this, so I made my own! OK, so not everyone can just go out and produce their own line of active clothing; it was something that I’m passionate about, so I spent a lot of time working on the design and it’s finally now gone into production. Anah Maria Active currently offers tracksuits, hijabs and a sports coat, but we’ll soon be launching outdoor kit and swimwear. The trick is to deliver loose-fitting garments that are still comfortable to wear and don’t get in the way of your activities.

4. Try exercising at home. If you’re really uncomfortable exercising in front of others, you could try investing in some home exercise equipment. It’s nowhere near as expensive to buy an exercise bike as it used to be, and you can pick up a balance ball for as little as £10. Anything you can do is better than nothing, so why not just give it a try?

Imam Ali once said, “Better than abundance of wealth is the health of the body.” I agree with that completely. Sure, you can do a lot of things if you’ve got the cash to splash; but you can’t buy good health: that’s something that you have to do for yourself, and trust that Allah will help you.

Checkout the new modest active range from Anah Maria at Anahmaria.com.